Archive for the ‘Saints Beati and Venerables’ Category.

Saint Giovanni of Pavia

Memorial

Profile

Bishop of Pavia, Lombardy, Italy from 801 to 813.

Died

  • 813 of natural causes

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Giovanni of Pavia“. Saints.SQPN.com. 14 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Blessed Jean of Caramola

Memorial

Profile

Benedictine hermit on Mount Caramola, Basilicata, Italy. Cistercian lay-brother at the abbey of Sagittario, Naples, Italy.

Born

Died

  • 1339 of natural causes
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Jean of Caramola“. Saints.SQPN.com. 11 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Blessed Jean Bassano

Memorial

Profile

Canon regular. Celestine Benedictine at Paris, France. Spiritual director of Saint Colette. Held several offices in his congregation, and worked to establish it in England and the Aragon region of Spain.

Born

Died

  • 1445 of natural causes
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Jean Bassano“. Saints.SQPN.com. 11 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Blessed Margaret of Faenza

Also known as

  • Margarita of Faenza
  • Margherita of Faenza
  • Marguerite of Faenza

Memorial

Profile

Benedictine Vallumbrosan nun at Saint John the Evangelist convent near Florence, Italy, where she eventually became abbess. Spiritual student of Saint Humilitas.

Born

Died

  • 1330 of natural causes
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Margaret of Faenza“. Saints.SQPN.com. 11 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Blessed María del Tránsito de Jesús Sacramentado

Also known as

  • María Cabanillas
  • María del Tránsito Cabanillas
  • María del Transito Eugenia de los Dolores Cabanillaswas
  • María del Tránsito Of Jesus In The Blessed Sacrament

Memorial

Profile

Third child born to Felipe Cabanillas and Francisca Antonia Luján Sánchez. Raised in a large, wealthy and pious family; she had ten siblings, three of whom died in childhood, one brother became a priest, three sisters nuns. Educated at home and then at Cordoba, Argentina where she studied and helped care for her seminarian younger brother until his ordination in 1853.

Maria’s father died in 1850, and the rest of the family moved to Cordoba, living near the church of San Roque. Maria stayed at home, helping her mother with the children, maintaining a personal piety and devotion to the Eucharist, working as a catechist, and visiting the poor and sick of Cordoba. Maria’s mother died on 13 April 1858.

With her family grown or gone, Maria now felt free to pursue her religious vocation, and she entered the Franciscan Third Order at age 37, devoting more of her day to prayer. In 1871 she met Mrs Isidora Ponce de León who was building a Carmelite monastery in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1872 Maria moved to Buenos Aries, and entered the monastery on 19 March 1873. For health reasons, she was forced to leave the cloister in April 1874. In September 1874 she entered the convent of the Sisters of the Visitation in Montevideo, Uruguay, but had to leave there in a few months due to her continuing health problems.

During this time of turmoil and rejection of her perceived vocation, Maria began again to ponder an idea that had followed her all her life – an education and assistance foundation to help children. Several Franciscans encouraged her, and Father Agustin Garzón offered her a house and his help and contacts. She obtained approval for the project on 8 December 1878, and with her companions Teresa Fronteras and Brigida Moyano, and Bother Cirlaco Porreca as director, she started the Congregation of the Franciscan Tertiary Missionaries of Argentina, dedicated to helping the poor, orphaned and abandoned. The three women made their religious profession on 2 February 1879, and their institute became offically affiliated with the Franciscans on 28 January 1880.

The new Congregation met with immediate success in vocations – the Argentinian colleges of Saint Margarite of Cortona in San Vicente, El Carmen in Rio Cuarto, and Immaculate Conception in Villa Nueva were founded during Maria’s lifetime. The work, however, ruined her already frail health, and she died within six years.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

  • if you have information relevant to this Cause, contact
       Fra Giovangiuseppe Califano, OFM
       Hermanas Terciarias Misioneras Franciscanas
       Calle Estados Unidos 2929
       X5006FGU Córdoba, ARGENTINA
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed María del Tránsito de Jesús Sacramentado“. Saints.SQPN.com. 9 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Blessed Giacomo Bianconi of Mevania

Also known as

  • Giacomo Bianconi da Bevagna
  • James Bianconi
  • James of Bevagna
  • Jacobus de Blanconibus de Mevania

Memorial

Profile

Joined the Dominicans at Spoleto, Italy at age 16 in 1236, choosing a life of extreme poverty even by Dominican standards. Founder and first prior of a Dominican friary in Mevania, Italy. Aided survivors and refugees in Mevania after it was sacked by emporer Frederick II in 1248. Helped quash the return of the Nicholaites anti-montanist heresy in Umbria, Italy. Reputed miracle worker.

Born

Died

Beatified

Additional Information

Readings

Merciful God, the sure hope of eternal salvation, you gave Blessed James courage. Show the same mercy to us that being washed in the blood of our Redeemer we may be counted among the sheep at your right hand for ever. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. - General Calendar of the Order of Preachers

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Giacomo Bianconi of Mevania“. Saints.SQPN.com. 5 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Blessing of Grapes

V. Our help is in the name of the Lord.
R. Who hath made heaven and earth.
V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with thy spirit.

Let us pray.
Bless, we beseech Thee, O Lord, this fresh fruit of the vine, which Thou hast graciously brought to full ripeness with the dew of heaven, abundant rain, and calm and fair weather. Thou hast given them for our use; grant that we may receive them with thanksgiving in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, the True Vine, who lives and reigns with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God for ever and ever.
R. Amen.

(And they are sprinkled with holy water.)

Blessed Maria of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ

[Blessed Maria of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ]
Also known as

  • Maria Grazia Tarallo

Memorial

Profile

Born to Leopoldo Tarallo and Concetta Borriello, Maria was raised in a pious family, and received a Christian education. She made a private vow of virginity at age five in front of a statue of the Blessed Mother. Made her First Communion at age 7, and received Confirmation at 10. Feeling drawn to religious life, at 22 she wanted to enter a convent, but her family opposed it, hoping she would marry; however, the young man who had proposed to her died before the wedding. She then entered the monastery of the Sisters Crucified Adorers of the Eucharist in Barra, Italy on 1 June 1891, taking the name Sister Maria of the Passion. Spiritual student of the Servant of God Maria Rosa Notari. Served as novice mistress and as spiritual guide to her sisters, worked in the kitchen and laundry, and as porter. Known for her life of charity, deep prayer, and devotion to her Congregation and the Eucharist.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

  • if you have information relevant to the beatification of Blessed Maria, contact
       Suore Crocifisse Adoratrici
       P.zzetta S. Gregorio Armeno, 1
       80138 Napoli, ITALY
Additional Information

Readings

My name is Sister Maria of the Passion and I must resemble the Master. - Blessed Maria

I want to be holy, loving Jesus in the Eucharist, suffering with Christ Crucified and seeing Christ in my brothers and sisters. - Blessed Maria

I exhort you to holy perseverance according to the Rule, readiness in obedience and especially daily Adoration of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. Love Jesus in the Eucharist, never leave him alone, do not anger him, do not disappoint him. - Blessed Maria to her Sisters

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Maria of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ“. Saints.SQPN.com. 2 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Catholic Encyclopedia – Venerable Robert Southwell

Article

Poet, Jesuit, martyr; born at Horsham Saint Faith’s, Norfolk, England, in 1561; hanged at Tyburn, 21 February 1595. His grandfather, Sir Richard Southwell, had been a wealthy man and a prominent courtier in the reign of Henry VIII. It was Richard Southwell who in 1547 had brought the poet Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, to the block, and Surrey had vainly begged to be allowed to “fight him in his shirt”. Curiously enough their respective grandsons, Father Southwell and Philip, Earl of Arundel, were to be the most devoted of friends and fellow-prisoners for the Faith. On his mother’s side the Jesuit was descended from the Copley and Shelley families, whence a remote connexion may be established between him and the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Robert Southwell was brought up a Catholic, and at a very early age was sent to be educated at Douai, where he was the pupil in philosophy of a Jesuit of extraordinary austerity of life, the famous Leonard Lessius. After spending a short time in Paris he begged for admission into the Society of Jesus–a boon at first denied. This disappointment elicited from the boy of seventeen some passionate laments, the first of his verses of which we have record. On 17 Oct., 1578, however, he was admitted at Rome, and made his simple vows in 1580. Shortly after his noviceship, during which he was sent to Tournai, he returned to Rome to finish his studies, was ordained priest in 1584, and became prefect of studies in the English College. In 1586 he was sent on the English mission with Father Henry Garnett, found his first refuge with Lord Vaux of Harrowden, and was known under the name of Cotton.

Two years afterwards he became chaplain to the Countess of Arundel and thus established relations with her imprisoned husband, Philip, Earl of Arundel, the ancestor of the present ducal house of Norfolk, as well as with Lady Margaret Sackville, the earl’s half-sister. Father Southwell’s prose elegy, “Triumphs over Death”, was addressed to the earl to console him for this sister’s premature death, and his “Hundred Meditations on the love of God”, originally written for her use, were ultimately transcribed by another hand, to present to her daughter Lady Beauchamp. Some six years were spent in zealous and successful missionary work, during which Father Southwell lay hidden in London, or passed under various disguises from one Catholic house to another. For his better protection he affected an interest in the pursuits of the country gentlemen of his day (metaphors taken from hawking are common in his writings), but his attire was always sober and his tastes simple. His character was singularly gentle, and he has never been accused of taking any part either in political intrigues or in religious disputes of a more domestic kind. In 1592 Father Southwell was arrested at Uxendon Hall, Harrow, through the treachery of an unfortunate Catholic girl, Anne Bellamy, the daughter of the owner of the house. The notorious Topcliffe, who effected the capture, wrote exultingly to the queen: “I never did take so weighty a man, if he be rightly used”. But the atrocious cruelties to which Southwell was subjected did not shake his fortitude. He was examined thirteen times under torture by members of the Council, and was long confined in a dungeon swarming with vermin. After nearly three years in prison he was brought to trial and the usual punishment of hanging and quartering was inflicted.

Father Southwell’s writings, both in prose and verse, were extremely popular with his contemporaries, and his religious pieces were sold openly by the booksellers though their authorship was known. Imitations abounded, and Ben Jonson declared of one of Southwell’s pieces, “The Burning Babe”, that to have written it he would readily forfeit many of his own poems. “Mary Magdalene’s Tears”, the Jesuit’s earliest work, licensed in 1591, probably represents a deliberate attempt to employ in the cause of piety the euphuistic prose style, then so popular. “Triumphs over Death”, also in prose, exhibits the same characteristics; but this artificiality of structure is not so marked in the “Short Rule of Good Life”, the “Letter to His Father”, the “Humble Supplication to Her Majesty”, the “Epistle of Comfort” and the “Hundred Meditations”. Southwell’s longest poem, “St. Peter’s Complaint” (132 six-line stanzas), is imitated, though not closely, from the Italian “Lagrime di S. Pietro” of Luigi Tansillo. This with some other smaller pieces was printed, with license, in 1595, the year of his death. Another volume of short poems appeared later in the same year under the title of “Maeoniae”. The early editions of these are scarce, and some of them command high prices. A poem called “A Foure-fold Meditation”, which was printed as Southwell’s in 1606, is not his, but was written by his friend the Earl of Arundel. Perhaps no higher testimony can be found of the esteem in which Southwell’s verse was held by his contemporaries than the fact that, while it is probable that Southwell had read Shakespeare, it is practically certain that Shakespeare had read Southwell and imitated him.

MLA Citation

  • Herbert Thurston. “Venerable Robert Southwell”. Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913. Saints.SQPN.com. 1 August 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>

Blessed Ioannes Yago

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Profile

Layman sailor of the archdiocese of Nagasaki, Japan. Member of the Confraternity of the Rosary. Martyrs.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

  • if you have information relevant to this Cause, contact
       Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Japan
       2-10-10 Shiomi Koto-ku
       Tokyo 135-8585, JAPAN
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Ioannes Yago“. Saints.SQPN.com. 26 July 2014. Web. 22 August 2014. <>