New Catholic Dictionary – Saint Luke

[Saint Luke painting the Virgin]
Article

Evangelist; born Antioch; died probably Bæotia, 74, author of the third Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. A native of Antioch, Luke received an excellent education in that city renowned for its learning; he studied medicine at Tarsus, and rose to prominence in his profession. From his knowledge of the eastern Mediterranean it is supposed that he traveled as a ship doctor. He also excelled in painting and sculpture, the Annunciation, Visitation, Nativity, and Shepherds being his favorite themes; a painting of the Virgin in Saint Mary Major at Rome is attributed to him. He was not a Jew, and from the perfection and fluency of his literary style, it is inferred that he was a Greek. He met Saint Paul at Troas and journeyed with him to Neapolis and Philippi as evangelist (Acts 16). He remained Saint Paul’s companion and helper on his missionary journeys and the Apostle speaks of Luke (Colossians 4) as “the most dear physician”; he visited Saint Paul frequently during his imprisonment at Caesarea, traveled to Rome and remained at his side during the two years imprisonment there, and was alone with Saint Paul at the time of his last imprisonment (2 Timothy 4). Little is known of him after the death of Saint Paul. He was unmarried and traveled to Achaia where he wrote his Gospel; according to some records he was martyred, though these are not authenticated. His Gospel is the longest and the finest from a literary viewpoint. Patron of physicians, artists, brewers, glass-workers, butchers, and notaries. Many societies of physicians, with philanthropical purposes, are named after him. Emblems: a book, ox, brush and palet. Relics at Padua, Italy. Feast, Roman Calendar, 18 October.

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Luke”. New Catholic Dictionary. Saints.SQPN.com. 7 October 2012. Web. 16 September 2014. <http://saints.sqpn.com/new-catholic-dictionary-saint-luke/>