New Catholic Dictionary: Saint Michael

[Michael the Archangel]
Article

Hebrew: who is like God?

Archangel, one of the three angels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture (Daniel 10 and 12; Jude; Apocalypse 12). In this last text, the sin of the bad angels is pictured as an uprising against God, in which the faithful angels, with Michael at their head, defeated Lucifer and his host, and cast them out of heaven. Because of this victory, Michael is revered in Catholic tradition and liturgy as champion and protector of the Church. Although he is always referred to as “the Archangel,” the Greek Fathers and many theologians place him over all the angels, making him the prince of the Seraphim. He became the patron of the sick and at Chairotopa, Colossae, Pythia, and elsewhere in Asia medicinal springs were dedicated to him. In Constantinople, Egypt, Rome, France, and Germany his cult was equally popular. Patron of France, Germany, of the sick, of knights, grocers, and mariners. Emblems: scales, banner, sword, and a dragon. Feast, Roman Calendar, 29 September; additional feast, 8 May, the Apparition of Michael, which took place on Monte Gargano in southeastern part of Italy.

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Michael”. People of the Faith. Saints.SQPN.com. 11 December 2010. Web. 28 July 2014. <http://saints.sqpn.com/new-catholic-dictionary-saint-michael/>