Pope Clement XIII

[portrait of Pope Clement]
Also known as
Carlo Della Torre Rezzonico
Profile
Son of John Baptist Rezzonico and Victoria Barbadigo, wealthy Venetian nobles. Educated by Jesuits at Bologna from age 10. Received his degrees in civil and canon law at Padua. Trained in Rome as a papal ambassador. Governor of Rieti in 1716. Judge of the Rota for Venice in 1725. Cardinal-deacon on 20 December 1737. Bishop of Padua on 19 March 1743. Known for his zeal in reforming his clergy, which was the topic of a synod in 1746. Cardinal-priest in 1747. Relucant pope in 1758.

Regalism and Jansenism were traditional enemies of the Vatican in its government of the Church. Using these two as instruments, the party of Voltaire and the educated and anti-Christian Encyclopedists were rising in power at the time. They planned for nothing less that the destruction of the Church, and felt the first step was to crush the Jesuits. They persuaded monarchs that the Jesuits were an obstacle to Regalism, and thus a danger to themselves, their rule, their realms. This situation faced Clement from the moment he took the crown.
Born
7 March 1693 at Venice as Carlo Della Torre Rezzonico
Papal Ascension
6 July 1758
Died
2 February 1769 at Rome, Italy
Images
Gallery of images of Pope Clement
Additional Information
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
Catholic Encyclopedia
New Catholic Dictionary
Canonizations
1767: Saint John of Kanty
Writings
A Quo Die: On Unity Among Christians, 13 September 1758
Cum Primum: On Observing Canonical Sanctions, 17 September 1759
Appentente Sacro: On the Spiritual Advantages of Fasting, 20 December 1759
In Dominico Agro: On Instruction in the Faith, 14 June 1761
Christianae Reipublicae: On the Dangers of Anti-Christian Writings, 25 November 1766
Summa Quae: On the Church in Poland, 6 January 1768
Readings
He was called the saint (by his people), and was an exemplary man who, notwithstanding the immense revenues of his diocese and his private estate, was always without money owing to the lavishness of his alms-deeds, and would give away even his linen.

Jansenist Abbé Clément, who was certainly no friend of the pope

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