Saint Philip of Adrianople

Also known as

  • Filippo

Memorial

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Deacon to Saint Hermes of Adrianople. During the persecutions of Diocletian, Saint Hermes and Saint Philip were ordered by governor Basso to close their church and turn over all scriptures and other documents, and all altar furnishings. When Hermes explained that he had no authority to do so, the two were imprisoned, flogged and executed. Martyr.

Died

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Philip of Adrianople“. Saints.SQPN.com. 21 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Saint Hermes of Adrianople

Also known as

  • Ermete

Memorial

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Bishop of Heraclea. During the persecutions of Diocletian, Saint Hermes and Saint Philip were ordered by governor Basso to close their church and turn over all scriptures and other documents, and all altar furnishings. When Hermes explained that he had no authority to do so, the two were imprisoned, flogged and executed. Martyr.

Died

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Hermes of Adrianople“. Saints.SQPN.com. 21 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Catholic Encyclopedia – Saint Wendelin of Trier

Article

Born about 554; died probably in 617. His earliest biographies, two in Latin and two in German, did not appear until after 1417. Their narrative is the following: Wendelin was the son of a Scottish king; after a piously spent youth he secretly left his home on a pilgrimage to Rome. On his way back he settled as a hermit in Westricht in the Diocese of Trier. When a great landowner blamed him for his idle life he entered this lord’s service as a herdsman. Later a miracle obliged this lord to allow him to return to his solitude. Wendelin then established a company of hermits from which sprang the Benedictine Abbey of Tholey. He was consecrated abbot about 597, according to the later legends. Tholey was apparently founded as a collegiate body about 630. It is difficult to say how far the later biographers are trustworthy. Wendelin was buried in his cell, and a chapel was built over the grave. The small town of Saint Wendel grew up nearby. The saint’s intercession was powerful in times of pestilence and contagious diseases among cattle. When in 1320 a pestilence was checked through the intercession of the saint, Archbishop Baldwin of Trier had the chapel rebuilt. Baldwin’s successor, Boemund II, built the present beautiful Gothic church, dedicated in 1360 and to which the saint’s relics were transferred; since 1506 they have rested in a stone sarcophagus. Wendelin is the patron saint of country people and herdsmen and is still venerated in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. He is represented in art as a youth, or as a bearded man, with a shepherd’s bag and a book in one hand and a shepherd’s crook in the other; about him feed lambs, cattle, and swine, while a crown and a shield are placed at his feet. Saint Wendelin is not mentioned in the Roman Martyrology, but his feast is observed in the Diocese of Trier on 22 October.

MLA Citation

  • Klemens Löffler. “Saint Wendelin of Trier”. Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913. Saints.SQPN.com. 21 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Lives of Illustrious Men – Malchion the presbyter

Entry

Malchion, the highly gifted presbyter of the church at Antioch, who had most successfully taught rhetoric in the same city, held a discussion with Paul of Samosata, who as bishop of the church at Antioch, had introduced the doctrine of Artemon, and this was taken down by short hand writers. This dialogue is still extant, and vet another extended epistle written by him, in behalf of the council, is addressed to Dionysius and Maximus, bishops of Rome and Alexandria. He flourished under Claudius and Aurelianus.

MLA Citation

  • Saint Jerome. “Malchion the presbyter”. Lives of Illustrious Men, translated by Ernest Cushing Richardson. Saints.SQPN.com. 21 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Blessed Iulianus Nakaura

Also known as

  • Giuliano
  • Julian

Memorial

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Jesuit priest. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

  • if you have information relevant to this Cause, contact
       Rev. Fernando Rojo Martínez, OSA
       Causa de Canonização dos Mártires do Japão
       na Estrada da Torre, 26
       1750-296 Lisboa, PORTUGAL
Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Blessed Iulianus Nakaura“. Saints.SQPN.com. 21 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Catholic Encyclopedia – Saint John Twenge

Article

Last English saint canonized, canon regular, Prior of Saint Mary’s, Bridlington, born near the town, 1319; died at Bridlington, 1379. He was of the Yorkshire family Twenge, which family in Reformation days supplied two priest-martyrs and was also instrumental in establishing the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Bar Convent, York. John completed his studies at Oxford and then entered the Priory of Bridlington. Charged successively with various offices in the community, he was finally despite his reluctance elected prior, which office he held until his death. Even in his lifetime he enjoyed a reputation for great holiness and for miraculous powers. On one occasion he changed water into wine. On another, five seamen from Hartlepool in danger of shipwreck called upon God in the name of His servant, John of Bridlington, whereupon the prior himself appeared to them in his canonical habit and brought them safely to shore. After his death the fame of the miracles wrought by his intercession spread rapidly through the land. Archbishop Neville charged his suffragans and others to take evidence with a view to his canonization, 26 July 1386; and the same prelate assisted by the Bishops of Durham and Carlisle officiated at a solemn translation of his body, 11 March, 1404, de mandato Domini Papae. This pope, Boniface IX, shortly afterwards canonized him. The fact has been doubted and disputed; but the original Bull was recently unearthed in the Vatican archives by Mr. T.A. Twemlow, who was engaged in research work there for the British Government. Saint John was especially invoked by women in cases of difficult confinement. At the Reformation the people besought the royal plunderer to spare the magnificent shrine of the saint, but in vain; it was destroyed in 1537. The splendid nave of the church, restored in 1857, is all that now remains of Bridlington Priory. The saint’s feast is observed by the canons regular on 9 October.

MLA Citation

  • Vincent Scully. “Saint John Twenge”. Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913. Saints.SQPN.com. 20 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Catholic Encyclopedia – Saint Hilarion

[Saint Hilarion of Gaza]Article

Founder of anchoritic life in Palestine; born at Tabatha, south of Gaza, Palestine, about 291; died in the island of Cyprus about 371. The chief source of information regarding him is the biography written by Saint Jerome. In the introduction Jerome mentions a letter from Saint Epiphanius, Archbishop of Salamis, in regard to the life of Hilarion whom Epiphanius had known personally during the hermit’s later years. The letter is not extant. A newly discovered life has been edited by Papadopulos-Kerameus (Analekta Ierosolymikes Stachyologias, V, 1898). Some special circumstances regarding Hilarion are related by the ecclesiastical historian, Sozomen, from oral traditions handed down by Hilarion’s disciples; among others that Sozomen’s grandfather and another relative were converted to Christianity by Hilarion.

Hilarion was the son of pagan parents. The date of his birth is ascertained from the statement of Jerome (Vita, c. xxv), that Hilarion, at the death of Anthony (356), was 65 years old. As a boy Hilarion’s parents sent him to Alexandria to be educated in its schools. Here he became a Christian, and at the age of fifteen, attracted by the renown of the anchorite, Saint Anthony, he retired to the desert. After two months of personal intercourse with the great “Father of Anchorites”, Hilarion resolved to devote himself to the ascetic life of a hermit. He returned home, divided his fortune among the poor, and then withdrew to a little hut in the desert of Majuma, near Gaza, where he led a life similar to that of Saint Anthony. His clothing consisted of a hair shirt, an upper garment of skins, and a short shepherd’s cloak; he fasted rigorously, not partaking of his frugal meal until after sunset, and supported himself by weaving baskets. The greater part of his time was devoted to religious exercises. Miraculous cures and exorcisms of demons which he performed spread his fame in the surrounding country, so that in 329 numerous disciples assembled round him. Many heathens were converted, and people came to seek his help and counsel in such great numbers that he could hardly find time to perform his religious duties. This induced him to bid farewell to his disciples and to return to Egypt about the year 360. Here he visited the places where Saint Anthony had lived and the spot where he had died. On the journey thither, he met Dracontius and Philor, two bishops banished by the Emperor Constantius. Hilarion then went to dwell at Bruchium, near Alexandria, but hearing that Julian the Apostate had ordered his arrest, he retired to an oasis in the Libyan desert. Later on he journeyed to Sicily and for a long time lived as a hermit near the promontory of Pachinum. His disciple, Hesychius, who had long sought him, discovered him here and soon Hilarion saw himself again surrounded by disciples desirous of following his holy example.

Leaving Sicily, he went to Epidaurus in Dalmatia, where, on the occasion of a great earthquake (366), he rendered valuable assistance to the inhabitants. Finally he went to Cyprus and there, in a lonely cave in the interior of the island, he spent his last years. It was during his sojourn in Cyprus that he became acquainted with Saint Epiphanius, Archbishop of Salamis. Before his death, which took place at the age of eighty, Hilarion bequeathed his only possession, his poor and scanty clothing, to his faithful disciple, Hesychius. His body was buried near the town of Paphos, but Hesychius secretly took it away and carried it to Majuma where the saint had lived so long. Hilarion was greatly honored as the founder of anchoritic life in Palestine. His feast falls on 21 October. The attempts of Israel and of other historians to relegate Hilarion to the realm of imagination have completely failed; there can be no doubt as to the historical fact of his life and the truth of its chief features.

MLA Citation

  • Johann Peter Kirsch. “Saint Hilarion”. Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913. Saints.SQPN.com. 20 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Saint Matthaeus Kohyoe

Also known as

  • Matthaeus of the Rosary
  • Mateo….
  • Matteo….
  • Matteus….

Memorial

Profile

Dominican novice and catechist. Martyr.

Born

Died

Venerated

Beatified

Canonized

Additional Information

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Matthaeus Kohyoe“. Saints.SQPN.com. 18 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

Catholic Encyclopedia – Saint Isaac Jogues

[Saint Isaac Jogues]Article

French missionary, born at Orléans, France, 10 January 1607; martyred at Ossernenon, in the present State of New York, 18 October 1646. He was the first Catholic priest who ever came to Manhattan Island (New York). He entered the Society of Jesus in 1624 and, after having been professor of literature at Rouen, was sent as a missionary to Canada in 1636. He came out with Montmagny, the immediate successor of Champlain. From Quebec he went to the regions around the great lakes where the illustrious Father de Brébeuf and others were labouring. There he spent six years in constant danger. Though a daring missionary, his character was of the most practical nature, his purpose always being to fix his people in permanent habitations. He was with Garnier among the Petuns, and he and Raymbault penetrated as far as Sault Ste Marie, and “were the first missionaries”, says Bancroft (VII, 790, London, 1853), “to preach the gospel a thousand miles in the interior, five years before John Eliot addressed the Indians six miles from Boston Harbour”. There is little doubt that they were not only the first apostles but also the first white men to reach this outlet of Lake Superior. No documentary proof is adduced by the best-known historians that Nicholet, the discoverer of Lake Michigan, ever visited the Sault. Jogues proposed not only to convert the Indians of Lake Superior, but the Sioux who lived at the head waters of the Mississippi.

His plan was thwarted by his capture near Three Rivers returning from Quebec. He was taken prisoner on 3 August 1642, and after being cruelly tortured was carried to the Indian village of Ossernenon, now Auriesville, on the Mohawk, about forty miles above the present city of Albany. There he remained for thirteen months in slavery, suffering apparently beyond the power of natural endurance. The Dutch Calvinists at Fort Orange (Albany) made constant efforts to free him, and at last, when he was about to be burnt to death, induced him to take refuge in a sailing vessel which carried him to New Amsterdam (New York). His description of the colony as it was at that time has since been incorporated in the Documentary History of the State. From New York he was sent; in mid-winter, across the ocean on a lugger of only fifty tons burden and after a voyage of two months, landed Christmas morning, 1643, on the coast of Brittany, in a state of absolute destitution. Thence he found his way to the nearest college of the Society. He was received with great honour at the court of the Queen Regent, the mother of Louis XIV, and was allowed by Pope Urban VII the very exceptional privilege of celebrating Mass, which the mutilated condition of his hands had made canonically impossible; several of his fingers having been eaten or burned off. He was called a martyr of Christ by the pontiff. No similar concession, up to that, is known to have been granted.

In early spring of 1644 he returned to Canada, and in 1646 was sent to negotiate peace with the Iroquois. He followed the same route over which he had been carried as a captive. It was on this occasion that he gave the name of Lake of the Blessed Sacrament to the body of water called by the Indians Horicon, now known as Lake George. He reached Ossernenon on 5 June, after a three weeks’ journey from the Saint Lawrence. He was well received by his former captors and the treaty of peace was made. He started for Quebec on 16 June and arrived there 3 July. He immediately asked to be sent back to the Iroquois as a missionary, but only after much hesitation his superiors acceded to his request. On 27 September he began his third and last journey to the Mohawk. In the interim sickness had broken out in the tribe and a blight had fallen on the crops. This double calamity was ascribed to Jogues whom the Indians always regarded as a sorcerer. They were determined to wreak vengence on him for the spell he had cast on the place, and warriors were sent out to capture him. The news of this change of sentiment spread rapidly, and though fully aware of the danger Jogues continued on his way to Ossernenon, though all the Hurons and others who were with him fled except Lalande. The Iroquois met him near Lake George, stripped him naked, slashed him with their knives, beat him and then led him to the village. On 18 October, 1646, when entering a cabin he was struck with a tomahawk and afterwards decapitated. The head was fixed on the Palisades and the body thrown into the Mohawk.

In view of his possible canonization a preliminary court was established in Quebec by the ecclesiastical authorities to receive testimony as to his sanctity and the cause of his death.

MLA Citation

  • Thomas Campbell. “Saint Isaac Jogues”. Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913. Saints.SQPN.com. 18 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>

American Cyclopaedia – Saint Luke

[Saint Luke the Evangelist]Profile

Luke, Saint, the evangelist, the author of the third Gospel, and, according to ecclesiastical tradition, also of the Acts of the Apostles. The name is now generally regarded as an abbreviation of Lucanus. It appears only three times in the New Testament. If these passages refer to the author of the Gospel, he was a physician and a collaborator of St. Paul. If Luke was also the author of the Acts, he was in A. D. 52 with Paul in Troas, and accompanied him thence as far as Philippi. He followed Paul on his third missionary tour through Macedonia, and by way of Troas, Miletus, Tyre, and Cæsarea, to Jerusalem, and was with him again when Paul was sent as a prisoner to Rome. This is all that is recorded of him in the New Testament, and even Irenæus knew nothing that could be added to it. Many more statements concerning his person are found in the ecclesiastical writers of later centuries. According to Eusebius and others, he was a native of Antioch. Epiphanius says that he was one of the 70 disciples, and one of the two disciples who went to Emmaus, and that he labored in Dalmatia, Italy, Macedonia, and especially in Gaul. Œcumenius says he went to Africa. The legend that he was a painter is first alluded to by Nicephorus. Constantinople, Patræ in Achaia, and several other towns are mentioned as the place where he died. Jerome ascribes to him an age of 84 years. The Roman Catholic church celebrates his festival on Oct. 18. The silence of the apostolic fathers concerning the Gospel of Luke indicates that it was admitted into the canon somewhat late. The first church writers who quote it are Justin Martyr and the author of the Clementine Homilies. Irenæus mentions that Luke wrote down the Gospel proclaimed by Paul; and all admit that at the time of Irenæus and Tertullian his Gospel was accepted throughout the whole church in its present form. A statement of Tertullian, that Marcion so changed a copy of the Gospel of Luke as to make it conform to his own views, has called forth in modern times a number of investigations of the relation of Luke’s Gospel, as we have it in the New Testament, to that of Marcion. Ritschl (Das Evangelium Marcions), Baur (Die kanonischen Evangelien), and others endeavored to prove that the Gospel of Luke as we have it is interpolated, and that the portions which Marcion is charged with having omitted were really unauthorized additions to the original document; but Volckmar, in his exhaustive treatise Das Evangelium Marcions (Leipsic, 1852), so completely demolished this theory that Ritschl abandoned his position, and Baur greatly modified his. The statement in the first verse of the Gospel of Luke, that “many” before him “have taken in hand to set forth a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,” has been understood by several interpreters as intimating an acquaintance with the Gospels of Matthew and Mark on the part of Luke, while others refer the expression “many” to other writers. As the occasion for writing his Gospel, the author himself mentions (i. 3, 4) his desire to give to his friend Theophilus a faithful narrative of the life of Christ. With regard to the time of its composition, the prevailing opinion before De Wette and Credner was, that it was written previous to the destruction of Jerusalem; but more recently the opinion that it was composed after that event has found advocates in different theological parties. According to Volckmar, Die Evangelien (Leipsic, 1870), the book was written about the year 100 by another author than the Pauline Luke. Achaia, Bœotia, and Alexandria are mentioned by the ancients, and Cæsarea and Rome are suggested by modern writers, as the place where the Gospel was composed. The Acts are likewise addressed to Theophilus. Valuable commentaries on both the Gospel and Acts are contained in the collective works of Olshausen, De Wette, Meyer, and Lange. Among the latest commentaries upon the Gospel are those of Goodwin (London, 1865), Stark (London, 1866), and Godet (Neufchâtel, 1870). Some other works, which have been sometimes ascribed to Luke in the ancient church, as Acta Pauli, Liturgiæ XII. Apostolorum, were long ago acknowledged to be spurious. See Schleiermacher, Die Schriften des Lucas (Berlin, 1817).

MLA Citation

  • “Saint Luke”. American Cyclopaedia, 1879. Saints.SQPN.com. 17 October 2014. Web. 22 October 2014. <>